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We love working with Mary. She is very responsive and very honest with us. If she thinks what we are doing is not right for our books, she will tell us. And she is very easy to work with.

Ojibwa LLC

I do not know how to keep my accounting records. Mary helped me get organized and she keeps my books for me. She also answers my question within a reasonable time period.

Stan, Rounding Inc.

The proper handling of personal taxes is difficult and time consuming enough, but when mixed with even more complex corporate tax and accounting situations, the job can seem overwhelming. When this happens it is no time for part-time, strip mall tax preparers or do-it-yourself software programs. You need a professional with the education, training, experience, communication skills, dedication and attention to detail your case deserves. For the past several years I have trusted Mary Pang, CPA with the management of all my accounting needs and have received, in my opinion, the highest level of professional service available in the state. Mary Pang, CPA is definitely Oklahoma's rising star of accounting!

Bobby Woolslayer, P.I.

Quick response times and very easy to work with!

Brittany Sears

I felt this was a very simple process and loved being able to do it via email and internet. Since I was doing everything from the comfort of my home, if I needed any additional documents, it was quick, convenient and easy for me to get them, as opposed to having to leave a location to return home for missing documents. I felt that Mary was very friendly and prompt in everything that she did. I would definitely feel comfortable returning to her for my taxes.

Nicole

Mary has been preparing my family business' taxes for years now. She also handles my mother's and my tax returns as well. She is always friendly and professional with her clients and tries her best to understand our tax situation. She works well with my sister's CPA in Oregon (due to our family business return) and is always available to answer our questions. If she is not available, she normally gets back to us within 1 day. We are very thankful to have her as our CPA and she is wonderful to work with.

Alfred

I have been Mary's client for 8 years now. She is my personal QuickBooks guru that I could email or call if I have any questions. She normally gets back to me within one day. She would give me step by step instructions on how to get something done in QuickBooks and if it is too much for me to handle, she will log into my computer remotely and get it fixed herself. If she is unable to fix it, she will get QuickBooks support to fix it for me or she will learn how to get it done. The best thing about Mary is that she will admit her mistakes. I have not met a lot of accountants who will admit their mistake. To me, that means she is honest and is humble enough to know everyone makes mistakes.

Angie

I am thankful to have Mary as my CPA. I can be sure that everything is taken care of and that my tax return is done right. Just recently, I received letters from IRS & Oklahoma Tax Commission. I have no idea what to do so I took those letters to Mary. She got right to it and called IRS & Oklahoma Tax Commission and got the issue fixed for me. She then calls me to explain what the issue was and what has been done to correct the situation. I appreciate the effort she took to explain it to me in a way I could understand. Best of all, I did not have to do anything other than getting the information to Mary and letting her handle it.

Catherine

Mary helped me in saving a lot of money in my payroll issue with IRS. Before our company hired Mary, we were paying a lot of payroll tax penalties because I am always so busy with my business and do not have the time to pay my payroll taxes on time. Once we hired Mary, we no longer have to worry about not paying our payroll taxes on time. She logs onto our computer remotely and she schedules the payment every week. I also feel confident because she is always available to answer questions. I can call her up & she will get back to me within a day. If she does not know the answer to my question, she will say so & look it up for me. She will then call or email me back with the answers she found out. I am very thankful to find a CPA who helps me and who is not scared of admitting that she does not know everything.

George

You couldn't ask for a better "hand-holding", expertise thoroughness, HARD WORKER!!!, with personality plus and a lovely demeanor. She's considerate, thoughtful and the very best part for me is patient!!! I ask a lot of questions...detailed, sometimes nit-picky questions. She always went out of her way to respond quickly and with the utmost respect. I wish she would go out on her own, as I'd follow her anywhere! Oh, and if she doesn't know an answer, she freely admits it and gets back to you promptly with the answer when she gets it. She works well/coordinating with other CPA firms/office personnel, even if that can be tricky and often holds up her work for you!

Paula Fenster Brust

I had no idea how to keep my books. I just didn't know all that comes with owning my business. When I contacted Mary, she was so helpful in explaining a lot of concerns I had and have me fix some early mistakes I had done. I still don't understand a lot of what's going on, but every time I have questions Mary is just a phone call away. She also sends me a text every 15 days or so to let me know I'm doing okay, plus a full report every month. Letting a professional do what she does best has just alleviated one of my biggest headaches and I know it is getting done the right way.

Triton Bixby

Mary helped us with our QuickBooks set up. She answered all our questions regarding QuickBooks & she trained us in how to effectively use QuickBooks for our business. We also asked for her help in getting our books up to date. She managed to get it done in 1 day and all I have to do is keep it going. We love working with Mary. She is friendly, very helpful & very prompt in her responses.

Lisa Pally

I was so pleased with this class. Mary is very knowledgeable and is very thorough. She explains information in a way you can understand it very clearly. If you have questions, she is more than willing to show you how to get things done! Highly recommend her expertise.

Marti Jackson

Mary has been very helpful in setting up our accounting in a small business we have started. She is very knowledgeable and willing to help in any way needed. She is an accountant wiz whom I have received nothing but great advice. I am so happy I met her!

Leonor Carnoske

Mary saved my QuickBooks. Mary recently helped us get our QuickBooks in order. I was expecting it to take hours but she was able to get us taken care of in a little over an hour. It is clear that she is knowledgeable and professional. I highly recommend her services.

Sandra Baca

Mary is extremely personable and knowledgeable in accounting. I really enjoyed her personality and friendliness as we discussed my business specifics. She was able to answer so many questions and anything she needed to look into further, she got back to me in a very timely manner. Mary was thorough in reviewing my documents and information before preparing my return. I am thankful I met Mary and look forward to working with her in the future!

Jackie Roberts

Blogs

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Suggestion for keeping your tax records
Tuesday, October 13, 2020

October 15 is the deadline for individual taxpayers who extended their 2019 tax returns. (The original April 15 filing deadline was extended this year to July 15 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.) If you’re finally done filing last year’s return, you might wonder: Which tax records can you toss once you’re done? Now is a good time to go through old tax records and see what you can discard.

The general rules

At minimum, you should keep tax records for as long as the IRS has the ability to audit your tax return or assess additional taxes, which generally is three years ...Continue Reading

Tax implications of working from home and collecting unemployment
Tuesday, September 15, 2020

COVID-19 has changed our lives in many ways, and some of the changes have tax implications. Here is basic information about two common situations.

1. Working from home.

Many employees have been told not to come into their workplaces due to the pandemic. If you’re an employee who “telecommutes” — that is, you work at home, and communicate with your employer mainly by telephone, videoconferencing, email, etc. — you should know about the strict rules that govern whether you can deduct your home office expenses.

Unfortunately, employee home office expenses aren’t currently deductible, even if your employer requires you to work from home. ...Continue Reading

Taxes on Your Social Security Benefits
Tuesday, August 25, 2020

If you’re getting close to retirement, you may wonder: Are my Social Security benefits going to be taxed? And if so, how much will you have to pay?

It depends on your other income. If you’re taxed, between 50% and 85% of your benefits could be taxed. (This doesn’t mean you pay 85% of your benefits back to the government in taxes. It merely that you’d include 85% of them in your income subject to your regular tax rates.)

Crunch the numbers

To determine how much of your benefits are taxed, first determine your other income, including certain items otherwise excluded for tax ...Continue Reading

What happens if an individual cannot pay taxes
Tuesday, August 18, 2020

While you probably don’t have any problems paying your tax bills, you may wonder: What happens in the event you (or someone you know) can’t pay taxes on time? Here’s a look at the options.

Most importantly, don’t let the inability to pay your tax liability in full keep you from filing a tax return properly and on time. In addition, taking certain steps can keep the IRS from instituting punitive collection processes.

Common penalties

The “failure to file” penalty accrues at 5% per month or part of a month (to a maximum of 25%) on the amount of tax your return ...Continue Reading

More parents may owe nanny tax this year, due to COVID-19
Tuesday, August 11, 2020

In the COVID-19 era, many parents are hiring nannies and babysitters because their daycare centers and summer camps have closed. This may result in federal “nanny tax” obligations.

Keep in mind that the nanny tax may apply to all household workers, including housekeepers, babysitters, gardeners or others who aren’t independent contractors.

If you employ someone who’s subject to the nanny tax, you aren’t required to withhold federal income taxes from the individual’s pay. You only must withhold if the worker asks you to and you agree. (In that case, ask the nanny to fill out a Form W-4.) However, you may have ...Continue Reading

Take advantage of a stepped up basis when you inherit property
Tuesday, July 21, 2020

If you’re planning your estate, or you’ve recently inherited assets, you may be unsure of the “cost” (or “basis”) for tax purposes.

Fair market value rules

Under the fair market value basis rules (also known as the “step-up and step-down” rules), an heir receives a basis in inherited property equal to its date-of-death value. So, for example, if your grandfather bought ABC Corp. stock in 1935 for $500 and it’s worth $5 million at his death, the basis is stepped up to $5 million in the hands of your grandfather’s heirs — and all of that gain escapes federal income tax forever.

The ...Continue Reading

Conduct a paycheck checkup to make sure your withholding is adequate
Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Did you recently file your federal tax return and were surprised to find you owed money? You might want to change your withholding so that this doesn’t happen next year. You might even want to do that if you got a big refund. Receiving a tax refund essentially means you’re giving the government an interest-free loan.

Withholding changes

In 2018, the IRS updated the withholding tables that indicate how much employers should hold back from their employees’ paychecks. In general, the amount withheld was reduced. This was done to reflect changes under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act — including an increase ...Continue Reading

Coronavirus related distribution from a retirement plan
Tuesday, June 23, 2020

As you may have heard, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act allows “qualified” people to take certain “coronavirus-related distributions” from their retirement plans without paying tax.

So how do you qualify? In other words, what’s a coronavirus-related distribution?

Early distribution basics

In general, if you withdraw money from an IRA or eligible retirement plan before you reach age 59½, you must pay a 10% early withdrawal tax. This is in addition to any tax you may owe on the income from the withdrawal. There are several exceptions to the general rule. For example, you don’t owe the additional 10% tax ...Continue Reading

Economic Impact Payment that was less than you expected
Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Nearly everyone has heard about the Economic Impact Payments (EIPs) that the federal government is sending to help mitigate the effects of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The IRS reports that in the first four weeks of the program, 130 million individuals received payments worth more than $200 billion.

However, some people are still waiting for a payment. And others received an EIP but it was less than what they were expecting. Here are some answers why this might have happened.

Basic amounts

If you’re under a certain adjusted gross income (AGI) threshold, you’re generally eligible for the full $1,200 ($2,400 for married couples ...Continue Reading

Answers to questions you may have about Covid-19
Tuesday, May 05, 2020

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has affected many Americans’ finances. Here are some answers to questions you may have right now.

My employer closed the office and I’m working from home. Can I deduct any of the related expenses?

Unfortunately, no. If you’re an employee who telecommutes, there are strict rules that govern whether you can deduct home office expenses. For 2018–2025 employee home office expenses aren’t deductible. (Starting in 2026, an employee may deduct home office expenses, within limits, if the office is for the convenience of his or her employer and certain requirements are met.)

Be aware that these are the rules ...Continue Reading

Answers to questions you may have about Economic Impact Payments
Tuesday, April 21, 2020

Millions of eligible Americans have already received their Economic Impact Payments (EIPs) via direct deposit or paper checks, according to the IRS. Others are still waiting. The payments are part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. Here are some answers to questions you may have about EIPs.

Who’s eligible to get an EIP?

Eligible taxpayers who filed their 2018 or 2019 returns and chose direct deposit of their refunds automatically receive an Economic Impact Payment. You must be a U.S. citizen or U.S. resident alien and you can’t be claimed as a dependent on someone else’s tax return. ...Continue Reading

COVID-19 - IRS announces more relief and details
Tuesday, April 14, 2020

In the midst of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, Americans are focusing on their health and financial well-being. To help with the impact facing many people, the government has provided a range of relief. Here are some new announcements made by the IRS.

More deadlines extended

As you probably know, the IRS postponed the due dates for certain federal income tax payments — but not all of them. New guidance now expands on the filing and payment relief for individuals, estates, corporations and others.

Under IRS Notice 2020-23, nearly all tax payments and filings that would otherwise be due between April 1 and July ...Continue Reading

CARES ACT changes retirement plan and charitable contribution rules
Tuesday, April 07, 2020

As we all try to keep ourselves, our loved ones, and our communities safe from the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, you may be wondering about some of the recent tax changes that were part of a tax law passed on March 27.

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act contains a variety of relief, notably the “economic impact payments” that will be made to people under a certain income threshold. But the law also makes some changes to retirement plan rules and provides a new tax break for some people who contribute to charity.

Waiver of 10% early distribution penalty

IRAs ...Continue Reading

Cash payments and tax relief for individuals in new law
Tuesday, March 31, 2020

A new law signed by President Trump on March 27 provides a variety of tax and financial relief measures to help Americans during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. This article explains some of the tax relief for individuals in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act.

Individual cash payments

Under the new law, an eligible individual will receive a cash payment equal to the sum of: $1,200 ($2,400 for eligible married couples filing jointly) plus $500 for each qualifying child. Eligibility is based on adjusted gross income (AGI).

Individuals who have no income, as well as those whose income comes entirely from ...Continue Reading

Individuals get coronavirus (COVID-19) tax and other relief
Tuesday, March 24, 2020

Taxpayers now have more time to file their tax returns and pay any tax owed because of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The Treasury Department and IRS announced that the federal income tax filing due date is automatically extended from April 15, 2020, to July 15, 2020.

Taxpayers can also defer making federal income tax payments, which are due on April 15, 2020, until July 15, 2020, without penalties and interest, regardless of the amount they owe. This deferment applies to all taxpayers, including individuals, trusts and estates, corporations and other non-corporate tax filers as well as those who pay self-employment tax.

No ...Continue Reading

Why you should keep life insurance out of your estate
Tuesday, March 17, 2020

If you have a life insurance policy, you probably want to make sure that the life insurance benefits your family will receive after your death won’t be included in your estate. That way, the benefits won’t be subject to the federal estate tax.

Under the estate tax rules, life insurance will be included in your taxable estate if either:

  • Your estate is the beneficiary of the insurance proceeds, or
  • You possessed certain economic ownership rights (called “incidents of ownership”) in the policy at your death (or within three years of your death).

The first situation is easy to avoid. You can just make sure ...Continue Reading

Reasons why married couples might want to file separate tax returns
Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Married couples often wonder whether they should file joint or separate tax returns. The answer depends on your individual tax situation.

It generally depends on which filing status results in the lowest tax. But keep in mind that, if you and your spouse file a joint return, each of you is “jointly and severally” liable for the tax on your combined income. And you’re both equally liable for any additional tax the IRS assesses, plus interest and most penalties. This means that the IRS can come after either of you to collect the full amount.

Although there are provisions in the law ...Continue Reading

There still might be time to cut your tax bill with IRAs
Tuesday, February 04, 2020

If you’re getting ready to file your 2019 tax return, and your tax bill is higher than you’d like, there may still be an opportunity to lower it. If you qualify, you can make a deductible contribution to a traditional IRA right up until the Wednesday, April 15, 2020, filing date and benefit from the resulting tax savings on your 2019 return.

Do you qualify?

You can make a deductible contribution to a traditional IRA if:

  • You (and your spouse) aren’t an active participant in an employer-sponsored retirement plan, or
  • You (or your spouse) are an active participant in an employer plan, and your ...Continue Reading
Answers to your questions about 2020 individual tax limits
Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Right now, you may be more concerned about your 2019 tax bill than you are about your 2020 tax situation. That’s understandable because your 2019 individual tax return is due to be filed in less than three months.

However, it’s a good idea to familiarize yourself with tax-related amounts that may have changed for 2020. For example, the amount of money you can put into a 401(k) plan has increased and you may want to start making contributions as early in the year as possible because retirement plan contributions will lower your taxable income.

Note: Not all tax figures are adjusted for ...Continue Reading

Deducting charitable gifts on your tax return
Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Many taxpayers make charitable gifts — because they’re generous and they want to save money on their federal tax bills. But with the tax law changes that went into effect a couple years ago and the many rules that apply to charitable deductions, you may no longer get a tax break for your generosity.

Are you going to itemize?

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), signed into law in 2017, didn’t put new limits on or suspend the charitable deduction, like it did with many other itemized deductions. Nevertheless, it reduces or eliminates the tax benefits of charitable giving for many ...Continue Reading

4 new law changes that may affect your retirement plan
Tuesday, January 07, 2020

If you save for retirement with an IRA or other plan, you’ll be interested to know that Congress recently passed a law that makes significant modifications to these accounts. The SECURE Act, which was signed into law on December 20, 2019, made these four changes.

Change #1: The maximum age for making traditional IRA contributions is repealed. Before 2020, traditional IRA contributions weren’t allowed once you reached age 70½. Starting in 2020, an individual of any age can make contributions to a traditional IRA, as long he or she has compensation, which generally means earned income from wages or self-employment.

Change #2: ...Continue Reading

Congress gives a holiday gift in the form of favorable tax provisions
Thursday, December 26, 2019

As part of a year-end budget bill, Congress just passed a package of tax provisions that will provide savings for some taxpayers. The White House has announced that President Trump will sign the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2020 into law. It also includes a retirement-related law titled the Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement (SECURE) Act.

Here’s a rundown of some provisions in the two laws.

The age limit for making IRA contributions and taking withdrawals is going up. Currently, an individual can’t make regular contributions to a traditional IRA in the year he or she reaches age 70½ and ...Continue Reading

Side gig - Make sure you understand your tax obligations
Tuesday, December 17, 2019

The number of people engaged in the “gig” or sharing economy has grown in recent years, according to a 2019 IRS report. And there are tax consequences for the people who perform these jobs, such as providing car rides, renting spare bedrooms, delivering food, walking dogs or providing other services.

Basically, if you receive income from one of the online platforms offering goods and services, it’s generally taxable. That’s true even if the income comes from a side job and even if you don’t receive an income statement reporting the amount of money you made.

IRS report details

The IRS recently released a ...Continue Reading

Medical expenses, what it takes to qualify for a tax deduction
Tuesday, November 26, 2019

As we all know, medical services and prescription drugs are expensive. You may be able to deduct some of your expenses on your tax return but the rules make it difficult for many people to qualify. However, with proper planning, you may be able to time discretionary medical expenses to your advantage for tax purposes.

The basic rules

For 2019, the medical expense deduction can only be claimed to the extent your unreimbursed costs exceed 10% of your adjusted gross income (AGI). You also must itemize deductions on your return.

If your total itemized deductions for 2019 will exceed your standard deduction, moving ...Continue Reading

Using your 401(k) plan to save this year and next
Tuesday, November 12, 2019

You can reduce taxes and save for retirement by contributing to a tax-advantaged retirement plan. If your employer offers a 401(k) or Roth 401(k) plan, contributing to it is a taxwise way to build a nest egg.

If you’re not already contributing the maximum allowed, consider increasing your contribution rate between now and year end. Because of tax-deferred compounding (tax-free in the case of Roth accounts), boosting contributions sooner rather than later can have a significant impact on the size of your nest egg at retirement.

With a 401(k), an employee elects to have a certain amount of pay deferred and contributed ...Continue Reading

IRA charitable donations are an alternative to taxable required distributions
Tuesday, October 29, 2019

Are you charitably minded and have a significant amount of money in an IRA? If you’re age 70½ or older, and don’t need the money from required minimum distributions, you may benefit by giving these amounts to charity.

IRA distribution basics

A popular way to transfer IRA assets to charity is through a tax provision that allows IRA owners who are 70½ or older to give up to $100,000 per year of their IRA distributions to charity. These distributions are called qualified charitable distributions, or QCDs. The money given to charity counts toward the donor’s required minimum distributions (RMDs), but doesn’t increase ...Continue Reading

Thinking of selling securities by year end - avoid the wash sale rule
Tuesday, October 22, 2019

If you’re planning to sell assets at a loss to offset gains that have been realized during the year, it’s important to be aware of the “wash sale” rule.

How the rule works

Under this rule, if you sell stock or securities for a loss and buy substantially identical stock or securities back within the 30-day period before or after the sale date, the loss can’t be claimed for tax purposes. The rule is designed to prevent taxpayers from using the tax benefit of a loss without parting with ownership in any significant way. Note that the rule applies to a 30-day ...Continue Reading

Watch out for tax-related scams
Wednesday, October 09, 2019

“Thousands of people have lost millions of dollars and their personal information to tax scams,” according to the IRS. Criminals can contact victims through regular mail, telephone calls and email messages. Here are just two of the scams the tax agency has seen in recent months.

  1. Fake property liens. A tax bill is sent from a fictional government agency in the mail. The fake agency may have a legitimate sounding name such as the Bureau of Tax Enforcement. The bill is accompanied by a letter threatening an IRS lien or levy based on bogus overdue taxes. (A levy is a legal ...Continue Reading
Uncle Sam may provide relief from college costs on your tax return
Tuesday, September 17, 2019

We all know the cost of college is expensive. The latest figures from the College Board show that the average annual cost of tuition and fees was $10,230 for in-state students at public four-year universities — and $35,830 for students at private not-for-profit four-year institutions. These amounts don’t include room and board, books, supplies, transportation and other expenses that a student may incur.

Two tax credits

Fortunately, the federal government offers two sizable tax credits for higher education costs that you may be able to claim:

1. The American Opportunity credit. This tax break generally provides the biggest benefit to most taxpayers. The ...Continue Reading

Innocent spouses may get relief from tax liability
Tuesday, August 13, 2019

When a married couple files a joint tax return, each spouse is “jointly and severally” liable for the full amount of tax on the couple’s combined income. Therefore, the IRS can come after either spouse to collect the entire tax — not just the part that’s attributed to one spouse or the other. This includes any tax deficiency that the IRS assesses after an audit, as well as any penalties and interest. (However, the civil fraud penalty can be imposed only on spouses who’ve actually committed fraud.)

Innocent spouses

In some cases, spouses are eligible for “innocent spouse relief.” This generally involves ...Continue Reading

The tax implications of being a winner
Tuesday, August 06, 2019

If you’re lucky enough to be a winner at gambling or the lottery, congratulations! After you celebrate, be ready to deal with the tax consequences of your good fortune.

Winning at gambling

Whether you win at the casino, a bingo hall, or elsewhere, you must report 100% of your winnings as taxable income. They’re reported on the “Other income” line on Schedule 1 of your 1040 tax return. To measure your winnings on a particular wager, use the net gain. For example, if a $30 bet at the race track turns into a $110 win, you’ve won $80, not $110.

You must separately ...Continue Reading

The kiddie tax hurts families more than ever
Tuesday, July 30, 2019

Years ago, Congress enacted the “kiddie tax” rules to prevent parents and grandparents in high tax brackets from shifting income (especially from investments) to children in lower tax brackets. And while the tax caused some families pain in the past, it has gotten worse today. That’s because the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) made changes to the kiddie tax by revising the tax rate structure.

History of the tax

The kiddie tax used to apply only to children under age 14 — which provided families with plenty of opportunity to enjoy significant tax savings from income shifting. In 2006, the tax ...Continue Reading

The “nanny tax” must be paid for more than just nannies
Tuesday, July 23, 2019

You may have heard of the “nanny tax.” But even if you don’t employ a nanny, it may apply to you. Hiring a housekeeper, gardener or other household employee (who isn’t an independent contractor) may make you liable for federal income and other taxes. You may also have state tax obligations.

If you employ a household worker, you aren’t required to withhold federal income taxes from pay. But you may choose to withhold if the worker requests it. In that case, ask the worker to fill out a Form W-4. However, you may be required to withhold Social Security and Medicare ...Continue Reading

Is volunteering for charity deductible
Tuesday, July 09, 2019

If you’re a volunteer who works for charity, you may be entitled to some tax breaks if you itemize deductions on your tax return. Unfortunately, they may not amount to as much as you think your generosity is worth.

Because donations to charity of cash or property generally are tax deductible for itemizers, it may seem like donations of something more valuable for many people — their time — would also be deductible. However, no tax deduction is allowed for the value of time you spend volunteering or the services you perform for a charitable organization.

It doesn’t matter if the services ...Continue Reading

Is an HSA right for you
Tuesday, June 18, 2019

To help defray health care costs, many people now contribute to, or are thinking about setting up, Health Savings Accounts (HSAs). With these accounts, individuals can pay for certain medical expenses on a tax advantaged basis.

The basics

With HSAs, you take more responsibility for your health care costs. If you’re covered by a qualified high-deductible health plan, you can contribute pretax income to an employer-sponsored HSA — or make deductible contributions to an HSA you set up yourself.

You own the account, which can bear interest or be invested. It can grow tax-deferred, similar to an IRA. Withdrawals for qualified medical expenses ...Continue Reading

Donating your vehicle to charity may not be a taxwise decision
Tuesday, June 11, 2019

You’ve probably seen or heard ads urging you to donate your car to charity. “Make a difference and receive tax savings,” one organization states. But donating a vehicle may not result in a big tax deduction — or any deduction at all.

Trade in, sell or donate?

Let’s say you’re buying a new car and want to get rid of your old one. Among your options are trading in the vehicle to the dealer, selling it yourself or donating it to charity.

If you donate, the tax deduction depends on whether you itemize and what the charity does with the vehicle. For cars ...Continue Reading

It’s a good time to check your withholding and make changes, if necessary
Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Due to the massive changes in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), the 2019 filing season resulted in surprises. Some filers who have gotten a refund in past years wound up owing money. The IRS reports that the number of refunds paid this year is down from last year — and the average refund is lower. As of May 10, 2019, the IRS paid out 101,590,000 refunds averaging $2,868. This compares with 102,582,000 refunds paid out in 2018 with an average amount of $2,940.

Of course, receiving a tax refund shouldn’t necessarily be your goal. It essentially means you’re giving ...Continue Reading

Selling your home, consider these tax implications first
Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Spring and summer are the optimum seasons for selling a home. And interest rates are currently attractive, so buyers may be out in full force in your area. Freddie Mac reports that the average 30-year fixed mortgage rate was 4.14% during the week of May 2, 2019, while the 15-year mortgage rate was 3.6%. This is down 0.41 and 0.43%, respectively, from a year earlier.

But before you contact a realtor to sell your home, you should review the tax considerations.

Sellers can exclude some gain

If you’re selling your principal residence, and you meet certain requirements, you can exclude up to $250,000 ...Continue Reading

Plug in tax savings for electric vehicles
Wednesday, May 01, 2019

While the number of plug-in electric vehicles (EVs) is still small compared with other cars on the road, it’s growing — especially in certain parts of the country. If you’re interested in purchasing an electric or hybrid vehicle, you may be eligible for a federal income tax credit of up to $7,500. (Depending on where you live, there may also be state tax breaks and other incentives.)

However, the federal tax credit is subject to a complex phaseout rule that may reduce or eliminate the tax break based on how many sales are made by a given manufacturer. The vehicles of ...Continue Reading

Three questions you may have after you file your return
Thursday, April 18, 2019

Once your 2018 tax return has been successfully filed with the IRS, you may still have some questions. Here are brief answers to three questions that we’re frequently asked at this time of year.

Question #1: What tax records can I throw away now?

At a minimum, keep tax records related to your return for as long as the IRS can audit your return or assess additional taxes. In general, the statute of limitations is three years after you file your return. So you can generally get rid of most records related to tax returns for 2015 and earlier years. (If ...Continue Reading

Working after age 70½ - You may not have to begin 401(k) withdrawals
Tuesday, March 26, 2019

If you participate in a qualified retirement plan, such as a 401(k), you must generally begin taking required withdrawals from the plan no later than April 1 of the year after which you turn age 70½. However, there’s an exception that applies to certain plan participants who are still working for the entire year in which they turn 70½.

The basics of RMDs

Required minimum distributions (RMDs) are the amounts you’re legally required to withdraw from your qualified retirement plans and traditional IRAs after reaching age 70½. Essentially, the tax law requires you to tap into your retirement assets — and begin ...Continue Reading

Some of your deductions may be smaller (or nonexistent) when you file your 2018 tax return
Tuesday, February 19, 2019

While the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) reduces most income tax rates and expands some tax breaks, it limits or eliminates several itemized deductions that have been valuable to many individual taxpayers. Here are five deductions you may see shrink or disappear when you file your 2018 income tax return:

1. State and local tax deduction. For 2018 through 2025, your total itemized deduction for all state and local taxes combined — including property tax — is limited to $10,000 ($5,000 if you’re married and filing separately). You still must choose between deducting income and sales tax; you can’t deduct ...Continue Reading

There is still time to get substantiation for 2018 donations
Tuesday, January 22, 2019

If you’re like many Americans, letters from your favorite charities have been appearing in your mailbox in recent weeks acknowledging your 2018 year-end donations. But what happens if you haven’t received such a letter — can you still claim an itemized deduction for the gift on your 2018 income tax return? It depends.

Basic requirements

To support a charitable deduction, you need to comply with IRS substantiation requirements. This generally includes obtaining a contemporaneous written acknowledgment from the charity stating the amount of the donation, whether you received any goods or services in consideration for the donation, and the value of any ...Continue Reading

2018 income tax rate
Tuesday, January 15, 2019

While the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) generally reduced individual tax rates for 2018 through 2025, some taxpayers could see their taxes go up due to reductions or eliminations of certain tax breaks — and, in some cases, due to their filing status. But some may see additional tax savings due to their filing status.

Unmarried vs. married taxpayers

In an effort to further eliminate the marriage “penalty,” the TCJA made changes to some of the middle tax brackets. As a result, some single and head of household filers could be pushed into higher tax brackets more quickly than pre-TCJA. For ...Continue Reading

A review of significant TCJA provisions impacting individual taxpayers
Wednesday, January 02, 2019

Now that 2019 has begun, there isn’t too much you can do to reduce your 2018 income tax liability. But it’s smart to begin preparing for filing your 2018 return. Because the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), which was signed into law at the end of 2017, likely will have a major impact on your 2018 taxes, it’s a good time to review the most significant provisions impacting individual taxpayers.

Rates and exemptions

Generally, taxpayers will be subject to lower tax rates for 2018. But a couple of rates stay the same, and changes to some of the brackets for certain ...Continue Reading

Year-end tax and financial to-do list for individuals
Thursday, December 13, 2018

With the dawn of 2019 on the near horizon, here’s a quick list of tax and financial to-dos you should address before 2018 ends:

Check your FSA balance. If you have a Flexible Spending Account (FSA) for health care expenses, you need to incur qualifying expenses by December 31 to use up these funds or you’ll potentially lose them. (Some plans allow you to carry over up to $500 to the following year or give you a 2½-month grace period to incur qualifying expenses.) Use expiring FSA funds to pay for eyeglasses, dental work or eligible drugs or health products.

Max out ...Continue Reading

Prepaying property taxes
Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Prepaying property taxes related to the current year but due the following year has long been one of the most popular and effective year-end tax-planning strategies. But does it still make sense in 2018?

The answer, for some people, is yes — accelerating this expense will increase their itemized deductions, reducing their tax bills. But for many, particularly those in high-tax states, changes made by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) eliminate the benefits.

What’s changed?

The TCJA made two changes that affect the viability of this strategy. First, it nearly doubled the standard deduction to $24,000 for married couples filing jointly, ...Continue Reading

Donate appreciated stock for twice the tax benefits
Wednesday, October 31, 2018

A tried-and-true year end tax strategy is to make charitable donations. As long as you itemize and your gift qualifies, you can claim a charitable deduction. But did you know that you can enjoy an additional tax benefit if you donate long-term appreciated stock instead of cash?

2 benefits from 1 gift

Appreciated publicly traded stock you’ve held more than one year is long-term capital gains property. If you donate it to a qualified charity, you may be able to enjoy two tax benefits:

  1. If you itemize deductions, you can claim a charitable deduction equal to the stock’s fair market value, and
  2. You can ...Continue Reading
Consider all the tax consequences before making gifts to loved ones
Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Many people choose to pass assets to the next generation during life, whether to reduce the size of their taxable estate, to help out family members or simply to see their loved ones enjoy the gifts. If you’re considering lifetime gifts, be aware that which assets you give can produce substantially different tax consequences.

Multiple types of taxes

Federal gift and estate taxes generally apply at a rate of 40% to transfers in excess of your available gift and estate tax exemption. Under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the exemption has approximately doubled through 2025. For 2018, it’s $11.18 million (twice ...Continue Reading

529 plans offer two tax-advantaged education funding options
Tuesday, October 09, 2018

Section 529 plans are a popular education-funding tool because of tax and other benefits. Two types are available: 1) prepaid tuition plans, and 2) savings plans. And one of these plans got even better under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA).

Enjoy valuable benefits

529 plans provide a tax-advantaged way to help pay for qualifying education expenses. First and foremost, although contributions aren’t deductible for federal purposes, plan assets can grow tax-deferred. In addition, some states offer tax incentives for contributing in the form of deductions or credits.

But that’s not all. 529 plans also usually offer high contribution limits. And there ...Continue Reading

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